It Is Advisable To Use PP Compression Fitting On Stationary Connections

If you look critically at pp compression fitting, one thing is apparent... they are designed to inhibit the movement of the pipe outward from the fitting. However, they do a poor job preventing the pipe from turning within the fitting. To visualize this, take the example of the connection

 

If you look critically at pp compression fitting, one thing is apparent... they are designed to inhibit the movement of the pipe outward from the fitting. However, they do a poor job preventing the pipe from turning within the fitting. To visualize this, take the example of the connection for a refrigerator icemaker.

Typically, a compression fitting is used to connect copper tubing to the icemaker. To prevent the thin 1/4" tubing from kinking or bending when the refrigerator is pushed back to the wall, an excess of tubing is normally "coiled" behind the refrigerator. This acts like a spring, expanding when the refrigerator is pulled out, and compressing when the fridge is pushed back.

A problem arises if the tubing is not solidly clamped to the rear of the refrigerator. Without this clamping, the tubing creates a rotational stress on the compression fitting as the fridge is moved, and can over time cause the tubing to rotate within the fitting, or even loosen the compression nut, causing a "stealth" leak behind the refrigerator. This can be a particularly nasty leak, because it can soak the floor with not evidence until the damage is severe... or until friendly, family-minded carpenter ants find the nice, damp wood!

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